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Showing posts from October 2, 2010

Balancing Hobbies and a Full-time Job in South Korea

[Claudine Williams wrote this guest post on behalf of MNUI, a travel insurance company. You might also want to check out her blog, "Korea-Diva".]
While working in South Korea, you may find that you still want to continue hobbies that you'd begun at home or new hobbies that you'll acquire in your new residence. It can be difficult to balance your home life with your work life, particularly in this country, where workers are expected to participate in extracurricular activities with other employees. You will find yourself in the middle of a balancing act, trying to complete what is expected of you on the job, while trying to do things that you enjoy. Don't end up giving up all things that enrich your life. You can balance family, friends, and your personal time if you set specific boundaries.

Although culturally, Korean people often go out for drinks, hiking expeditions, or travel with co-workers, I have seen Korean people bow out gracefully from these requirements…

Dealing With Culture Shock when Working Abroad

[Claudine Williams wrote this guest post on behalf of MNUI, a travel insurance company. You might also want to check out her blog, "Korea-Diva".]

Culture shock is a common experience when moving abroad to work. Some people experience feelings of unease, homesickness, or have trouble adapting to their new environment. The feelings stem from being placed into new surroundings with different expectations, which may vary considerably from your own culture. Therefore, the social and business norms may differ in your new country, making you feel uneasy.

You may also miss your family or friends, your favorite foods, or your car back home. In countries where your native language is not spoken, you may miss the ability to speak fluently in your own language anytime you wish. Some people simply experience a general feeling of unease. They can't communicate what they don't like about their new surroundings. They simply have misgivings.

The first step to overcoming culture shock …